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The International Fund for Survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence

In a historic moment on December 10, 2018, Dr. Denis Mukwege and Ms. Nadia Murad received the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts to fight sexual violence as a weapon of war.  Together they shared a vision to provide survivors of conflict related sexual violence with reparations and other forms of redress.

 

To realize that vision, Dr. Mukwege and Ms. Murad, in cooperation with Ms.  Patten, the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG-CSV) established the International Fund for Survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (Fund), to address a gap long identified by survivors of conflict-related sexual violence.

 

The Fund will be officially launched on October 30 in New York City, during the commemorations at the United Nations of the 10th anniversary of the Office of the SRSG-CSV.

 

The Fund is an innovative, survivor-centric mechanism whose mission is to ensure survivors of conflict-related sexual violence have access to reparations and other forms of redress globally.  It will complement efforts to prevent sexual violence, to ensure justice and provide holistic care, including where states or other parties responsible for the violence are unwilling or unable to provide reparations.

 

The core principle of the Fund is its survivor-centric character. Placing the voices of survivors at the center will ensure programs are initiated locally and truly benefit the individuals they are designed to serve.  Collaboration, human capacity and dignity will be the cornerstones of every aspect of its work.

 

During the G7 meeting in August, French President Emmanuel Macron announced France’s support by committing 6 million Euros to the Fund.  EU Council President Donald Tusk also expressed the EU’s support by pledging 1 million Euros.

UPDATE: On September 25, Commissioner  EU Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development Neven Mimica pledged 2 million Euros to the Fund.

 

Only a tiny minority of survivors of sexual violence worldwide receive reparations through formal justice mechanisms.  In recognition of this, the Fund will adopt a broad approach which includes reparations and other forms of redress, including compensation, rehabilitation and acknowledgements, all of which will contribute to rebuilding shattered lives and fighting stigma.

 

The Fund will be a mechanism to raise and allocate resources for reparations programs and other forms of redress including where states or other parties responsible for the violence are unwilling or unable to provide reparations.  It will also contribute to the development of those programs, provide technical advice, collect and disseminate good practices, and advocate for duty-bearers to assume responsibility.

A detailed concept note will be released at the end of October.  The official launch of the Fund is a monumental step forward to bring acknowledgement and compensation to survivors worldwide.